Holidays and time off work

27th April 2018

There are many different reasons that people take time off work – for example, they may be ill or need to care for their children, or simply want a holiday. This post explains which employment rights apply to different kinds of leave.

Get help with time off disputes

Holiday pay

Most workers have the right to a certain amount of paid holiday each year. Exactly how much time they can take off generally depends on how many hours they work as well as what is stated in their employment contract.

Most workers have the right to a certain amount of paid holiday each year.

Maternity and paternity leave

The birth of a child is a busy and stressful time, so it’s little surprise that employment laws grant new parents the right to take time off to recuperate and care for their new arrival. Find out about your rights and entitlements with our guides to maternity leave and paternity leave.

Sick leave

If you fall ill, you have the right to take time off work and you may also be entitled to receive Statutory Sick Pay (SSP).

Parental leave and dependents

If you are a parent, or have other dependents such as elderly relatives who depend on you for their care, there may be times when you need to take time off work to attend to these responsibilities. Under the law, you have the right to take a certain amount of leave from your job in order to do this.

Temporary lay-offs

In situations where there is not enough work for employees to do, your employer may decide that some employees will be temporarily laid off, meaning they do not attend work for a certain amount of time. You may retain your normal employment rights, including the right to be paid, during a lay-off, but this can depend on your employment contract and situation.

Time off for public duties or training

If you wish to undergo training or another form of study, you may have the right to request time off work from your employer for this purpose. Likewise, you might be able to take leave from your job if you have been called for jury duty or have certain other responsibilities outside of work which fall into the category of “public duties”.

Problems with leave

If you feel that your employer is preventing you from taking leave that you are entitled to without a good reason, you may wish to take action against them. For advice on making a grievance, seek expert legal advice.

Compensation rules for delayed flights

If you’ve had your holiday tainted by a delayed flight, there is legislation which entitles you to reimbursement.

August 2019 Learn more
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