DAS Law blog

The school nativity – danger in the manger?

What is the legal position when it comes to videos and photographs of school events?

24th November 2017

Antony DiPalma, solicitor at DAS Law, looks at the photographic minefield of the school nativity play.

It used to be that the school's nativity play was documented by hundreds of proud parents snapping away on their cameras, but more recently school politics and privacy issues have become relevant, with some schools ruling that it is unacceptable to take pictures or videos of the show. But what is the legal position?

My child's school has a blanket ban on taking photos at the nativity play. Is this legal?

Any owner of private property may restrict the use of photography or video equipment on the premises. If ignored you may be asked to leave and may be deemed to be trespassing if you refuse.

I signed a form stating that I won't take any photos. What are the consequences should I choose to ignore this?

The consent form is unlikely to be legally enforceable as a contract if there is no financial loss to the school and there are no laws generally against taking photographs of your own or other people’s children as long as the photographs are not deemed ‘indecent’, or are likely to have the effect of harming or harassing the children.

Are there any laws against sharing group shots of my child's nativity play online?

As best practice it is advisable that parents should avoid sharing photographs of children without obtaining prior consent of that child’s parent or guardian. However, as long as the photographs are not deemed ‘indecent’, or are likely to have the effect of harming or harassing them then there is nothing legally stopping you from doing so.

What action can I take against people who share photos of the nativity play on social media that include my child?

You can ask the person to remove the photograph, however if they refuse there is no realistic legal action you can take. Privacy laws under the Human Rights Act cannot be enforced against other private individuals and unless you own the copyright in the photograph or the image is offensive or indecent then the social media site has no obligation to remove that photo if it is reported to them.

If I blur out the other children's faces, can I share photos online then?

You don’t have to blur out children’s faces in order to share them online, as the Data Protection Act doesn’t apply to photographs taken for private use and which do not identify the child (i.e. name them). However, if you would be concerned about images of your own child appearing without your permission, blurring out other children’s faces may be a sensible step to take.

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